The crisis is not a natural disaster that simply happens; the crisis is the outcome of the choices of all those who want to maintain this system, in which we are exploited, repressed and governed. Their proposals on how to come out of the crisis do not differ from suggestions on how the existing situation could be reinforced and take root. Our propositions can be nothing less than strikes and solidarity, occupations and sabotage, expropriations and mutual help… in order to create the world that we choose for ourselves, against all kinds of segregations and hierarchy.

-Assembly of the revolted in (the island of ) Salamina, (and the neighborhoods of) Perama, Keratsini, Nikaia, Koridallos, Piraeus

While the IMF meets in Washington, D.C. this weekend, Greece’s financial troubles have continued to deepen. Greek Prime Minister Papandreou chose the remote Aegean island of Kastelorizo on Friday to announce his government was to activate the IMF-EU “rescue” plan, effectively throwing the proletariat and lower middle classes in the country at the mercy of international financial giants. IMF loans always have nasty strings attached, rules that force the recipient to re-structure their economy along a neo-liberal, privatized, U.S. friendly model due to the influential U.S. position in the IMF.

The current situation in Greece has many similarities to the IMF crisis in Argentina in 2002 that sparked a nation-wide rebellion and created a of worker-run businesses in its wake. Add to this crisis the recent revelations that the Greek ruling class has been evading paying its share of taxes for years, and you have a country that is turning into a powder keg.

This is social war at its peak; this is the guarantee that the Greek standard of living will be crushed, and that a dictatorship of capital shall reign.

Read the rest of this entry »



From The New York Times:

It was a silent call to arms: an easy-to-overlook message urging New Jersey students to take a stand against the budget cuts that threaten class sizes and choices as well as after-school activities. But some 18,000 students accepted the invitation posted last month on Facebook, the social media site better known for publicizing parties and sporting events. And on Tuesday many of them — and many others — walked out of class in one of the largest grass-roots demonstrations to hit New Jersey in years.

Michelle Ryan Lauto, 18, a college freshman, joined students who walked out of High Tech High School in Bergen County. It was Ms. Lauto’s Facebook message urging students to take a stand against budget cuts that led to the protests around the state. “All I did was make a Facebook page,” she said. “Anyone who has an opinion could do that and have their opinion heard.”

The largest turnout was in Newark, where thousands of students from various high schools converged on City Hall.

The protest disrupted classroom routines and standardized testing in some of the state’s biggest and best-known school districts, offering a real-life civics lesson that unfolded on lawns, sidewalks, parking lots and football fields.

The mass walkouts were inspired by Michelle Ryan Lauto, an 18-year-old aspiring actress and a college freshman, and came a week after voters rejected 58 percent of school district budgets put to a vote across the state (not all districts have a direct budget vote). Read the rest of this entry »

From PR Daily Sun:

University of Puerto Rico students successfully, and almost without a significant incident, paralyzed academic and administrative operations at the Río Piedras campus Wednesday after university officials had vowed to keep the institution open.
A group of several dozen students who had stayed within campus premises since Tuesday night joined others coming into the campus on Wednesday morning and successfully locked the gate on Barbosa Avenue as early as 6:00 am.
At the gate five or six university guardsmen had tried to stop the students in a kind of tug o’ war with them to control the gate. In the melee some of the guardsmen and students were crushed between one another and exchanged some blows. Meanwhile, several others were pepper sprayed in a confusing incident.
Twenty minutes later the same group of students had crossed the campus and locked UPR’s main gate at Ponce de León Avenue without incident.

“By insisting in keeping the gates open the administration is trying to provoke a confrontation,” said Student Negotiating Committee member Adriana Mulero, who Wednesday morning called the first of the two days stoppage “a success.”
“They [university officials] expected we would come around 4:00 am to close the campus main gate. Instead, we took refuge at the university itself – the way it is meant to be – last night and this morning proceeded to close the gate on Barbosa Avenue,” explained Mulero, also a member of the Public Education Student Defense Committee.
Mulero informed the students had organized themselves to occupy the UPR “from within while avoiding confrontation.”
But for UPR’s Interim Chancellor Ana Guadalupe far from avoiding confrontation, the students had provoked it.
In a last minute press conference Guadalupe announced that as of 9:45 Wednesday morning she had decreed an indefinite academic and administrative recess for the Río Piedras Campus.
“It is my responsibility to provide a peaceful and quiet atmosphere for classes and other campus activities to take place, where students, professors and employees can fulfill their tasks,” Said Guadalupe.
“Up until the violent incident where 19 security officers were pepper sprayed and assaulted with pipes, pieces of wood with nails [sticking out], chains and other objects, in a clear violation of the demonstrators commitment to uphold the no confrontation policy, we see no alternative other than the indefinite academic and administrative recess,” added the Chancellor.
Questioned how many of the UPR police had been beaten and injured Guadalupe said that all 19 officers had been injured. But reports from several journalists covering the incident all agreed that no more than six university guardsmen had been involved in the incident that took place at the gate on Barbosa Avenue and that only two of them had exchanged blows with the students. Press reports of the incident also specify that it was one of the guardsmen who pepper sprayed the crowd but that the wind had carried the irritating substance towards his fellow officers.
Guadalupe insisted that the number of injured officers had been 19 but declined to offer any evidence on the subject while assuring that “all evidence will be presented in due time.”

Act of provocation
Despite the lack of official information Secretary of State and acting Governor, Kenneth McClintock, authorized Police Superintendent José Figueroa Sancha to assist university authorities by “taking control of the campus’ outer perimeter.” Police presence, including that of the Tactical Operations Division (riot squad) members, would later prove to be interpreted as an act of provocation in what had been until then a relatively calm student demonstration.
The chancellor said her decision could be reversed only if the striking students agreed to adhere to the no confrontation policy, which will entail free access to the institution, no interruption of the classes or administrative activities.
Guadalupe had scheduled a meeting for 3:00 pm Wednesday with the demonstrating students and the negotiating committee to discuss her proposals and theirs. Like UPR president José R. De La Torre, Guadalupe said she has always been open to negotiate and would meet with the negotiating committee even if they are not official student representatives as described in the institution’s rules and regulations.
The chancellor did not commit herself to accept any of the students’ proposals but assured she would consider those over which she has authority to decide.
Nevertheless, the chancellor’s offer didn’t surprise the students.
“Her announcement is but a confirmation of our victory. She had said that campus operations would be as usual but we have clearly demonstrated that was not so,” General Student Council president Gabriel Laborde.
“I think that one of the first items in the agenda is for her to recognize those 16 committee members are legitimate student representatives …” added Laborde.
After “winning” their first day in battle the students refused to leave the campus even though their stoppage seemed to turn “academic” since the chancellor had announced and indefinite recess for the campus. The demonstrators’ persistence prompted the administration to present a legal action against them at the San Juan Judiciary Center.
The injunction submitted by the university administration requested the court order the students to desist from their actions interfering with access to campus grounds. Superior Court Judge José Negrón, who reviewed the recourse Wednesday afternoon, reserved his decision on the injunction and as of Wednesday night had not yet filed it.
By nightfall, UPR students, still in control of the campus’ gates had a standoff with members of the riot squad. The incident which spurred tension on both sides of the UPR’s main gate started when a student leader was denied access to the premises by a group of students. The argument escalated into a struggle for control of the gate.
Minutes later a riot squad platoon lined up in front of the gate with their batons at hand and ready. Their presence provoked the students’ ire, who immediately took to the gate and started yelling insults at the officers.
The situation took almost an hour of intense negotiations between Police brass and Puerto Rican University Professors Association members before the riot squad retired from the gate.

An undetermined number of students decided to stay inside the campus for the night while others left. It was unclear whether the demonstrations would continued today or be postponed until classes resume next week or later.

These videos show a fast-moving and unfortunately a quickly-contained moment of unrest at a peaceful protest outside the capitol building in Phoenix. A Neo-Nazi/Minuteman type and the cops defending him were under attack by the crowd, most of whom had just legally been made second-class citizens based on the color of their skin. The eruption of rage was calmed by peace police (who should probably just join the force already). Note that the videos are titled “Mexicans” riot because they are uploaded to Youtube by racist fucks; obviously there are many nationalities rioting in the video.

The Phoenix Class War Council reports on more actions resisting SB7010 including a lockdown and statewide walkouts involving thousands of high school and college students.

Updates on Ocuparte

April 24, 2010

Three nights ago it seemed that the strike and occupation at the University of Puerto Rico was done for as an army of riot cops, swat teams, and helicopters surrounded the campus preparing for a raid. Due to incredible support and vigilance from the community no raid occurred, and not only does the strike and occupation continue but it has spread to at least 8 (of 11) other campuses. What was being reported as a violent student action (due to a report 19 “injured” security guards, of which I’ve found no evidence of online, and sounds like a typical administration fabrication we’re quite familiar with at the New School) has become a national situation, as more union actions and wildcat strikes continue to occur in solidarity.

In this Video police forcibly evict public school teachers occupying the collector’s office at the Treasury Department for the Retirement system. Another video shows professors and parents gathered at the gates of UPR watching and mocking police.

UC Rebel Radio from Berkeley has translated this letter from the striking students to the entire nation.

We hope the strike continues to proliferate, and the cops/administrators continue to look like fucking fools. Solidaridad desde New York City!


An Occupation and student strike in Puerto Rico is about to be violently supressed, but not before the administration cancelled the rest of the semester and closed “indefinitely”. This Chronicle of Higher Education story reports the closure is due to 19 injured security guards in clashes with striking students and faculty as they occupied space throughout the day. More information about these clashes can be found here (Spanish), including stories about barricades, humans chains, terrified administrators and policiticians, and students being pepper sprayed and beaten up. Here are some english language updates from their Solidarity page about the situation of the past two days:

The PR Police elite forces are gathering near the University. It looks like the state wants to crash the strike with its violence, with no intention of any negotiation. That’s how the UPR administration is trying to defend its anti-universitary policies. Shame on them!!!!
The police and private rent-a-cops are already congregating around the university grounds. It is now 2:00 AM local PR time.

Event page was set up for the strike action today.

The students at the UPR Humacao campus have joined in and declared a 48-hour strike alongside the original stoppage at UPR Rio Piedras.
The UPR President has publicly stated that they cannot negotiate with the students because we have nothing to negotiate. He states that there is no atmosphere for dialogue from the students, even though we have called him directly to meet.
–> The UPR President has echoed this stance; there is an attempt to divide the student movement.
The chief of the police (superintendent José Figueroa Sancha) has said that the students at the UPR are a bunch of troublemakers and that they will do their part if called upon by the UPR administration. The state university has a non-confrontation policy which prohibits the state police from entering university grounds after various violent confrontations from the 1940s-1980s.
Preparations continue as the UPR Río Piedras prepares for 48 hours of work/study stoppage that will begin on wednesday morning and the possibility of an indefinite strike that could begin on friday.
Our Student Negotiating Committee went to meet, as planned, the President of the UPR today. They were, however, greeted by no one and left again since there was none to meet with. (April 20th)

It seems that as a gesture of “good will” that the administration of the UPR went ahead and painted over the work done by the students at the occupation. At the same time, opposite groups of students against the 48-hour strike, and any resistance in general have sprung up around Facebook. It seems that we’re facing a multi-front assault.
One of the workers union (the HEEND) of the UPR and the Association of University Professors of Puerto Rico (APPU) have expressed their public solidarity with the students as they prepare for a work/study stoppage on wednesday, April 21, 2010. Family and friends of the students organize as well to attend the strike in solidarity

Press Release from the I Am collective:

Today in Brooklyn NY, the NYPD entered without a warrant 13 Thames Art Space, a Bushwick based art and performance space where members of the Independent Anarchist Media (I AM) Collective have been organizing the Fourth Annual NYC Anarchist Film Festival in honor of Brad Will.

Two plainclothes detectives entered first, followed quickly by a Lieutenant and vans full of blue shirt officers. After corralling everyone present in the back room, they searched the space and detained two members of the collective.

The I AM collective was preparing for the NYC Anarchist Film Festival, a showcase of resistance movements and insurrectionary events from around the world presented from an anarchist and anti-authoritarian perspective.

Our response to the raid: regardless of these attacks, the film festival will happen as planned on Friday April 16, 2010 at Judson Memorial Church. The voice of decentralized creative communities will not be silenced by police repression. They cannot raid us, because we are everywhere.

Trailer for the Film Fest:

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico – Students in the Faculty of Humanities and the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras have announced their plans to occupy both faculties on April 12th.

“Throughout the day we will have performances, music, poetry, art, work-shops and concerts. We will occupy against funding cuts, decrease of students rights and moratorium on tuition waivers.”

Ocúp(arte): The Humanities Manifesto

The Humanities faculty is yours, his, hers, and ours. Let’s transform it then, into an active and dynamic space filled with participation and collaboration. Let’s modify the State and the Administration-fed attitudes of competition and anxiety, and replace them with cooperation, compassion and youthful jubilation. As existing power structures have already started to crack and shown their anti-humanist agendas; so let today and tomorrow be filled with love and a call to action. Our academic spaces are under siege from the powerful, and must be reclaimed as tools for liberation. As humanists we can imagine and create all sorts of possible worlds. It is time to realize them.

We are occupying our faculty in order to find ourselves, to cast aside any attempt to separate and alienate us. Instead of this kind of death, we have decided to un-muzzle our mouths and let the world know that a new world has taken shape from our hearts. We are a multitude which thinks, reflects, and criticizes; a generation whose heartbeat is steeled by the shared interaction between the fist and a kiss. Read the rest of this entry »

From newschoolsenate.org:

Candidate A

… for the party of abstention and absurdity, a positive platform based on the enforced decay of all social institutions and practices. from the university student senate, emanations of a melancholy sadness. we party and we work, the lines are being blurred. what is social networking? or more accurately, what isn’t? we produce social capital, we absorb debt, we integrate and assimilate and die and die again. a mechanism for the destruction of possibility, is your university apparatus. a comedy. a tragedy.

if i am elected to the universal senate for the maintenance of student passivity and social death, i will probably not care.

Candidate B

Political society uses morality as a tool for the public to believe in the legitimacy of the political society itself,Choose from the most used tags in Post Tags often positioning itself as more moral than political societies of the past, which engaged in varying degrees of atrocious acts. Political institutions are capable of feigning legitimacy only in that they prevent worse political organizations from gaining or regaining political power. To run for, or to run from? This is the central question. The secretary bird is a terrestrial bird of prey. Who are you? A candidate allows constituents to feast upon the candidate’s supple flesh. Constituents allow candidates to play a role. The secretary bird is related to the vulture; the twitter bird is related to isolation. Sagittarius serpentarius does not stay in one place pecking away at policy and reform like bits of grain. DO YOU WANT TO BE EATEN? Policy is a dead substance. It is eaten despite its lack of nutritive value. Destroy policy. Destroy value. The life of the nomad is not one that is willed upon the unwilling like a plague. The nomad tattoos it personally to the feet. Fill form. Submit form. Peck at grain. Peck at polls. Stamp posts. Post stamps, posterchild.

Videos from SFSU

April 9, 2010

“Who’s down for going in?”
“Let’s do it.”

“You don’t have no answers for why you choked a black man in this fucking door, why you let a white girl get in this building, you don’t have answers for shit! You should feel like shit for what your job is.”

Today at UCSD a rally (and occupation?) is underway to save Professor Ricardo Dominguez, March 4th participant and pro-immigrant activist. Yesterday SFSU students responded to $744 fines for December occupiers of the business building by breaking into an administration meeting and refusing to leave the building. (Pictures from the action here and here). Monday also saw a protest at Berekely over various charges and suspensions against activists there.

The lack of action post-March 4 has lead to some speculation as to whether the unfolding autonomous student movements has already folded, either as a result of overly messianic rhetoric, or, conversely, liberal recuperation. The action of the last week is evidence of a different story, one of suppression from university administrations and police, and emerging resistance against it. These judicial procedures, criminal charges, crippling fines, and suspensions are in a way a test; they may either result in the death of these uprisings or more wood for the fire. We’re looking forward to latter.

Stay tuned to Occupy CA for updates on UCSD.

From Indybay:

San Francisco, April 4-Housing activists and occupation minded activists gathered in the rain at noon today at 24th and Mission in San Francisco to rally against the crime of residential building left vacant while people are left out on the streets in the cold and rain.

Homes Not Jails, a direct action nonviolent group that regularly opens up such buildings for people to live in, sponsored the rally. Periodically Homes Not Jails organizes a pubic action to highlight this tragic situation and take action to show how easily the problem could be remedied. Such was today’s street action.

After rallying in the inclement weather, the assembled marched down Mission Street, chanting “Homes Not Jails” as the Liberation Brass Band added vibrant musical riffs to the mix. The march, accompanied by a large SFPD presence, soon arrived at the former home of Jose Morales at 572 San Jose Avenue in the Mission District. There they were greeted by a group of occupiers who had taken over the building, hanging out banners as the crowd cheered them on. Police fanned out around the area, but took no further action.

A number of speakers, including SF poet laureate Jack Hirschman, articulated many of the reasons the action was necessary, specifically the failure of government on all levels to do a damn thing about houses sitting empty while people suffer and die trying to live outside.

The final speaker was former resident Jose Morales himself. At first overcome with emotion, the Latino octogenarian passionately outlined his struggles to keep his home of 4+ decades, and his decade and a half resistance to eviction attempts by various landlords at his San Jose Avenue home. Morales explained that he was finally forced out illegally through the Ellis Act, a state law that allows property owners to empty buildings if they contend they are going out of the landlord business. Jose Morales was one of thousands in San Francisco booted out of their homes through the Ellis Act by unscrupulous speculators.

The landlord said he was going to turn the property into condos, but when the economy tanked that plan went down the tubes too, and consequently Jose Morales’ home has sat empty for over two years, while Morales himself became homeless.

Meanwhile the mood turned festive at the occupation site. Banners waved in the rain and wind, the brass band funkified the street, and East Bay Food Not Bombs served scrumptious free food, as it had at the rally.

The SFPD, for its part, stood idle. In order to legally take action to oust the squatters, the cops need the landlord to declare the occupiers to be trespassers. Evidently the police were having difficulty locating the (in name only) property owner, and as the afternoon went on, the cops withdrew until they had only a token presence.

And so the occupiers prepared to spend a pleasant and peaceful evening at home,as the heavens poured down their approval.

For more information, read the Libcom guide to squatting.

From Glassbead Collective:

Video

PORTLAND, Ore. — Someone vandalized the Portland Police union headquarters doing thousands of dollars in damage early Tuesday.

Spokesman Scott Westerman said just before 1 a.m., bricks and rocks were thrown through their windows, doing about $20,000 worth of damage to the outside of the building.

Eight people were arrested and three officers were injured Monday night when protesters clashed with police in downtown Portland in a rally against two recent officer-involved shootings. DETAILS: Police protests

Westerman said computers and other items were damaged inside the office.

No suspects have been named in the case.

More videos from Monday’s march: Read the rest of this entry »




For the second consecutive week a black bloc caused havoc in Portland in response to two police murders in the last two months. Aaron Campbell in late January, and Jack Dale Collins on March 22nd. According to Portland IMC’s timeline, the marchers evaded police, went through campus buildings at Portland State University, blockaded streets, smashed the window of a Bank of America, and finally made their way to a “justice center” where prisoners inside could be seen “showing solidarity fists, banging on the windows.” 8 people were arrested during the march.

Joel Dow, an anarchist arrested last week, is still in jail after his bail was set to an absurd $259,000.


Last week hundreds of students in Victoria, BC celebrated planting season by occupizing the quad of their school, ripping up the lawn and turning it into fertile soil. The aim of the project was to bring the community together produce food for their own resources. On Friday, the administration destroyed the 10 new garden plots, arresting one student who stood in the path of one of their bulldozers. Students have responded by storming the office of the administrator who ordered the destruction, and also vow to replant the gardens once again.

More information on their blog.


Another Video
A longer commentary on the action on Anarchist News